Ancestor Links – Genealogy Data

This section includes:

  1. Subsections with the ancestors of each of my grandparents – the
    HAYES, WEBB, ARCHIBALD, DAND and related families.
    1. A list of ancestors by generation.
    2. A list of family surnames.
    3. An index of individual names.
    4. A list of sources (bibliography) used.
    5. An Ancestor Chart.
  2. Additional subsections with cousin and allied family ancestor lines - the
    DENTON & JONES/CHALMERS, DIXSON & HONEYMAN, HILLIS & MILNE, LAWRENCE, MACKENZIE & MILLER, MILES and related families.
  3. Ancestor & Descendant Summaries - James I Stewart, King of Scotland; Henry III, King of England and Edward I "Longshanks" King of England
  4. Comments regarding the Genealogy Data and “General” & “Research” Notes.
  5. General Comments regarding Spelling Variations of Family Names.
  6. General Comments regarding Genealogy Sources.
  7. In Development.

1.1  HAYES Ancestors and related families - Index
 (Updated - Q1 2015)


1.2  WEBB Ancestors and related families - Index
 (Updated - Q4 2011)


1.3  ARCHIBALD Ancestors and related families - Index
 (Updated - Q4 2011)


1.4  DAND Ancestors and related families - Index
 (Updated & Expanded - Q3 2010)


2.1  HILLIS & MILNE Ancestors and related families - Index
 (New - Q4 2011)


2.2  DENTON & JONES/CHALMERS Ancestors and related families - Index
 (Updated & Expanded - Q3 2012)


2.3  MACKENZIE & MILLER Ancestors and related families - Index
 (New - Q1 2012)


2.4  DIXSON & HONEYMAN Ancestors and related families - Index
 (New - Q4 2011)


2.5  LAWRENCE Ancestors and related families - Index
 (Updated & Expanded - Q3 2013)


2.6  MILES Ancestors and related families - Index
 (Updated - Q1 2012)


3. Ancestor & Descendant Summaries
(Updated & Expanded - Q2 2015)

Interesting summaries of the variety of Ancestors and Descendants that would be found on an Hourglass Ancestor/Descendant Family Tree for:


Notes:

[*1] James I Stewart, King of Scotland - was 5th/6th Cousin 4/5 times removed with - Edward I "Longshanks" King of England.

[*2] Edward I "Longshanks" King of England - was a son of Henry III, King of England & Eleanor of Provence.


4. Comments regarding the Data and “General” & “Research” Notes

The Ancestor Links - Genealogy Data web pages will be updated from time to time - as the pages are all part of an in-process family genealogy – that is being updated as new information is uncovered.

GeneralandResearchNotes have been added and include information such as:

  1. For the earliest recorded ancestor of a Scottish Clan Chief – the name of the Clan and brief information regarding the Clan.
  2. For ancestors who were Early New England Settlers - the name of the ship (where known) and the name of the town and year - where the individual first settled in New England.
  3. For ancestors where a relevant Memorial Monument/Tablet has been identified – information regarding the wording and location.
  4. For ancestors where Notable and Famous Descendants have been identified (such as Kings/Queens; U.K. Prime Minister; U.S. Presidents, Senators and Governors; Inventors; Founders of well known Companies/Organizations such as Kodak; and others) – the name and brief information regarding the notable descendant.
  5. To Do” notes have also been added where further research is needed (such as to identify earlier ancestors; to identify the name of a spouse; to check a published source).

Please let me know if you come across information that is not correct and/or if you have information (supported by sources) that would help add known information to the Ancestor Links – Genealogy Data on this website (such as information for additional siblings, spouses and ancestors).

There is a wealth of further background information included in the sources that have been cited – especially in the published family specific genealogy sources.


5. General Comments regarding Spelling Variations of Family Names

When searching information (both electronic and non-electronic) for Family Names (Surnames, Last Names) - it is important to search for several variations of spelling for any given name.

As an example - some spelling variations for the name Hayes - Hay, Haye, Haya, Heye, Haies, Hais, Haise, Haig, Haize, Hays, Hayse, Hayz, Hayze, Haz, Haze ...

It is not uncommon to come across an ancestor - where his/her family name is spelled differently on his/her Birth, Marriage and Death records and other documents.
One of the main reasons for this is that the further back in time we go - there was no “correct” spelling for a name.
In addition, some cultures use different spelling of family names in order to identify whether the individual is male or female.

The issue/problem has become even more complex with the rapid growth of electronic search possibilities and searchable electronic databases.

In addition to the above mentioned historical spelling variations - electronically searchable information has unfortunately introduced additional spelling variations due to the following:
  1. Optical Character Recognition (OCR) issues where OCR software may not correctly interpret/transcribe written information.
    This can be due to software issues and/or poor quality of the original text and/or a poor quality electronic scan.
  2. Manual errors made by individuals transcribing original documents/texts.
    This can be due to a high volume of information being transcribed and/or misinterpretation of difficult to read text and/or handwriting.
  3. Errors made by non-native speaking individuals transcribing original documents/texts that are in a different language.
Any of the above can be the source of significant issues/problems with large electronic databases.

As an example the conversion of old genealogy books into electronic databases may be done using OCR software - see point (i) above - or by the re-typing of the entire book - see points (ii) and (iii) above.


6. General Comments regarding Genealogy Sources

Primary Sources” (such as Birth, Marriage and Death records, Wills, Land records ... and for Medieval genealogy - Patent Rolls, Fine Rolls, Close Rolls ...) are considered to be the most reliable sources for genealogical information.

Secondary and Other Sources” (such as Published Family Genealogies; Town Histories/Genealogies; Regional Histories/Genealogies) include valuable information for different generations of a family and/or families. However, these “Secondary and Other Sources” are also somewhat like a database - and as we all know - most databases tend to include a certain percentage of errors. The drawback of any errors that these “Secondary and Other Sources” may contain - is usually more than offset by the wealth of background information and clues included in these sources.
When available - it is important to check the addendum and corrections section(s) for any important corrections and/or additions that may relate to your research.

An on-going and significant genealogy research challenge - is to identify whether published information has been subsequently updated with more recent published research that enhances, amends or corrects earlier published information.
For a short list of reference books with lists of published information by family name (U.K.) or by individual name (Early Eastern North American Settlers - New England, New York …) - plus regional compendiums - click here.

7. In Development

Also check the “In Development” section of this website - which includes the new “GenBooks2Trees” section that presents Genealogical information from Sources - such as Published Family Genealogy Books - transformed into Dynamic Family Trees.



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